Nutcracker Ballet - Indianapolis (IN)

Performances
GREAT RUSSIAN NUTCRACKER
Murat Theatre at Old National Centre
Wednesday, December 4, 2019 - 7:00 pm
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The Gift of Christmas Tour Comes to Indianapolis Wednesday, December 4

Moscow Ballet brings the Gift of Christmas Tour to Indianapolis with Great Russian Nutcracker performances bringing holiday magic to life and creating unforgettable memories for all ages. The company performs at Murat Theatre at Old National Centre on Wed., Dec. 4, 7 p.m. only.

Moscow Ballet makes Christmas gift giving easy with the holiday performance that delights all ages…from the life-sized Kissy Doll to the fierce, red-eyed Rat King; and the Russian Troika Sleigh bringing Masha through the Snow Forest to the Land of Peace and Harmony which is populated with 10 foot tall dancing puppets, exotic flying birds and dancing couples from the world’s five great heritages. 

About Host Studio: The Fox Hill Dance Academy

Although The Fox Hill Dance Academy is primarily a ballet school; they teach tap, hiphop, jazz, theater, and liturgical dance. Students start at the age of three to pre-professional level and beyond. Fox Hill Dance Academy is a multicultural, multigenerational school that has been part of Indianapolis, Indiana for over thirty years.  Coupled with The Fox Hill Dance Foundation, Inc., the Academy has trained many underserved youth, who otherwise might not have the means to take three or more ballet classes a week.  However, with the added support from the Foundation, many Fox Hill students have been accepted into various University dance departments and companies and a few have become professional dancers.

About the Old National Centre

The Old National Centre, originally known as the Murat Shrine, the oldest stage house in downtown Indianapolis, is now an entertainment venue. Originally built and owned by the Murat Shiners’, its namesake is the Nubian Desert oasis Bir Murat, which itself was named for Frenchman Joachim Murat, one of Napoleon's generals. The building features include stained-glass windows, terra cotta trim, and a 208 foot tall tower at the southeast corner. The Egyptian-themed auditorium opened coincidentally with the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922. In its early days it featured Broadway plays and a 1932 speech by Winston Churchill. Between 1948 and 1963, it was the only road show venue in Indianapolis and for a time it was the home of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. The main sections are the 1,800-seat concert hall, the 2,500-seat performing arts theater and nine more areas for hosting events.